Image of a woman in headscarf holding an umbrella. Quote "We can do it.". Established 1942.

The Second World War was considered a “total war”, which required governments to utilize their entire populations to defeat their enemies. With the men away at war, millions of women were encouraged to work in industry and take over the jobs previously done by men at the time.

Women responded to the call, working heavy construction machinery, taking roles in lumber and steel mills as well as hard-physical labour including unloading freight, making munitions and much more.

Images of women workers were widespread in the media of the day and the idea of Rosie the Riveter originated in a song written in 1942 by Redd Evans ands John Jacob Loeb.

The identity of the “real” Rosie the Riveter is debated, but candidates include:

Rosina “Rosie” Bonavita who worked for Convair in San Diego, California. 

Rosalind P. Walter, who worked on the night shift building the F4U Corsair fighter.

And Rose Will Monroe, a riveter at the Willow Run Aircraft Factory building B-24 Bombers.

Over six million women got war jobs: African American, Asian and White women worked side by side.

We salute them all.

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